Carlsen, Dines

(1901 - 1966)

Fall in Connecticut with Three Barns

Carlsen, Dines - American (1901 - 1966) - Fall in Connecticut with Three Barns
   
Carlsen, Dines - American (1901 - 1966) - Fall in Connecticut with Three Barns
   
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  • Artist Name: Carlsen, Dines
  • Artist Nationality: American
  • Birth-Death Dates: (1901 - 1966)
  • Artwork Title: Fall in Connecticut with Three Barns
  • Subject: Landscape
  • Medium: Oil on canvas
  • Signed: Lower right, “Dines Carlsen”
  • Presentation: Fine carved and gilt replacement frame with gilt wide liner
  • Unframed Dimensions: 24" x 20"
  • Verso: Sticker: with artist name and title of work Estate stamped on reverse

Dines Carlsen was born in New York City on March 28, 1901. Dines was the son of the celebrated Danish-American artist Emil Carlsen (1853-1932) who was a teacher at the National Academy of Design. At the young age of seven, Dines traveled with his father to Europe to sell his artwork. At the age of 11 years old he once again accompanied his father to Europe and the Virgin Islands.

As a teenager, Dines Carlsen began exhibiting at the National Academy. He also exhibited multiple times at the Art Institute of Chicago, Corcoran Gallery, and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. In 1929, the Macbeth Galleries organized a show of Dines' works alongside his father's work.

From the Frick Collection website:

"The Macbeth Gallery was founded in 1892 by William Macbeth in New York City, the first gallery at that time to deal solely in American art.

The most famous of Macbeth's exhibitions was that of The Eight, in 1908. Robert Macbeth, the son of William Macbeth, joined the firm in 1909 and became president in 1917. He established the Gallery as one of the leading firms in New York.

Robert McIntyre, nephew of William Macbeth, joined the firm in 1903 and became president of the gallery on the death of his cousin Robert in 1940. He closed the Gallery in 1953."

While the European art world advanced post-impressionism, fauvism, surrealism, Dadaism, futurism and other pre-abstract expressionist styles, Dines Carlsen continued to paint still lifes, portraits, and landscape series in an impressionistic style. A majority of Dine's landscapes came from inspirations he got while vacationing in the United States and Mexico. Until his father's death in 1933, Dines lived in Falls Village, Connecticut with his father. After his father's death, Carlsen moved to Falls River, Connecticut and wintered in Summerville, North Carolina, where he taught art students in his home.

Dines Carlson died in New York City in 1966. Carlsen's paintings remain in both private and public collections that include the Carnegie Museum of Art, Corcoran Art Gallery, the John Herron Institute, and the Sweat Memorial Art Museum. Following his death in 1966, Grand Central Station mounted a dual exhibition of his and his father's work.

Sources:

Dearinger, D.B. Carlsen,Dines [Internet]. 2004.
Available from: http://mirappraisal.com/dines-carlsen-american-impressionist-painter/

Dines Carlsen [Internet]. 2013, June.
Available from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dines_Carlsen

Biography for Dines Carlsen [Internet]. 2013, June.
Available from: http://www.askart.com/AskART/artists/biography/dinescarlsen

Dines Carlsen [Internet]. 2013, June.
Available from: http://www.artnet.com/artists/dines-carlsen

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